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Course Offerings & Scheduling Handbook

Jackson County

Area Technology Center

 

Course Offerings

&

Scheduling Handbook

2018-19

 

KentuckyKY Tech
Automotive Technology

Tim Tankersley

 

School Year   2018-2019

First Period

Second Period

Third Period

Fourth Period

Sixth Period

Seventh period

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

Section A

 

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

 Section B

 

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

Section A

 

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

 Section D

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

Section C

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

 

Section D

 

 

AUT 150

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section A

 

 

 

9-10

 

These courses introduce the student to the principles, theories, and concepts of Automotive Technology, and include instruction in the maintenance and light repair of Engines, Brake Systems, Electrical/Electronic Systems, Suspension and Steering Systems, Automatic and Manual Transmission/Transaxles, and Engine Performance Systems. In all areas, appropriate theory, safety, and support instruction will be taught and required for performing each task, including proper care and cleaning of customers vehicles. The instruction will also include identification and use of appropriate tools and testing/measurement equipment required to accomplish certain tasks. The student will also receive the necessary training to locate and use current reference and training materials from accepted industry publications and resources, and demonstrate the ability to write work orders.

 

AUT 150

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section B

 

9-10

 

All Tasks for the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Sections B, C, and D are listed in the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section A Task List.

 

 

 

AUT 150

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section C

 

11-12

 

All Tasks for the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Sections B, C, and D are listed in the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section A Task List.

AUT 150

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section D

 

11-12

 

All Tasks for the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Sections B, C, and D are listed in the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section A Task List.

Special Problems I

 

 

 

12

Courses designed to enhance a student’s understanding of shop situations and problems that arise when dealing with live work. It expands on the task lists that have already been taught to the student in previous Auto Courses. The instructor will teach students how to deal with real world problems that arise when repairing automobiles subjected to various types of customer road use. Prerequisite: Completion of the Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Courses/Sections A, B, C and D.

 

 

 

TRANSPORTATION  EDUCATION  CAREER  PATHWAYS 2018-2019

 

AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE AND LIGHT REPAIR TECHNICIAN

CIP 47.0604.01

 

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: This pathway prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, service, and maintain all types of automobiles. Includes instruction in brake systems, electrical systems, engine performance, engine repair, suspension and steering, automatic and manual transmissions and drive trains, and heating and air condition systems.

 

 

BEST PRACTICE COURSES

 

 

EXAMPLE

ILP-RELATED

CAREER TITLES

Complete (4) FOUR CREDITS

* 470507 Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section A and Lab

* 470509 Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section B and Lab

* 470511 Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section C and Lab

* 470513 Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Section D and Lab

 

These courses can be taken in ANY order.

There are NO prerequisites required to enter these classes.

 

Automotive Service Technician

Auto Detailer

Automotive Recycler

Customer Service Representative (Service Writer/Advisor)

Dispatcher

Warranty Clerk

Automobile Salesperson

Service Manager

 

 

 

Wood Manufacturing Technology

Marvin Wilder

 

School Year    2018-2019

First Period

Second Period

Third Period

Fourth Period

Sixth Period

Seventh Period

Technical Drawing and  Blueprint Reading/ Wood Finishing

 

Furniture

Technology

Cabinetmaking

WOOD   PRODUCT MANUFACTURING

WOOD   PRODUCT MANUFACTURING

Furniture

Technology

 

 

 

 

Wood Product Manufacturing

 

WMT 120

 

9-10

Fundamentals of wood processing and an overview of the secondary wood processing industry are covered in this course. The nature of wood, material selection, terminology, safe setup, and operation of common woodworking equipment will be discussed. Each student will fabricate a wood product while being introduced to custom woodworking techniques, as well as mass production concepts related to product engineering.

 

Technical Drawing and Blueprint Reading

½ Credit

 

WMT 110

 

9-10

 

Fundamentals of multiview and pictorial drafting techniques; and reading and interpreting architectural, furniture, and cabinet drawings are the focus of this course. Students will apply blueprint reading skills by preparing materials and cutting lists for actual job.

Wood Finishing

½ Credit

 

WMT 160

 

9-10

 

This course is an overview of contemporary spray finishing materials and processes for millwork  assemblies. Students will learn to set up and troubleshoot a variety of common finishing systems while experimenting with finishing materials and supplies.

Furniture Technology

 

WMT 250

 

10-11

Furniture design principles, structural considerations, joinery, fasteners, veneering, and use of specialized machines for complex operations are the focus of this course. Students will plan and build a piece of furniture which includes at least one drawer, a door and some veneering.

 

Prerequisites: Technical Drawing and Blueprint Reading - 480719 Wood Product Manufacturing - 480740

 

 

 

Cabinetmaking

 

WMT 240

 

10-11

This course is an overview of the cabinet and store fixture industries. Emphasis will be placed on the design and construction of face frame as well as frameless (32mm) systems.

Students will plan and build a vanity, kitchen cabinet, or shop project which utilizes contemporary casework techniques.

 

Prerequisites: Technical Drawing and Blueprint Reading - 480719 Wood Product Manufacturing - 480740

Millwork Technology

 

WMT 260

 

12

Design of molding, doors, and door frames; windows; stairs; and mantels are the focus of this course. Emphasis will be placed on construction principles, joinery, and fasteners for millwork assemblies. Students will build one or more millwork items.

 

Prerequisites: Technical Drawing and Blueprint Reading - 480719 Wood Product Manufacturing - 480740

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WOOD MANUFACTURING CAREER PATHWAYS 2018-2019

 

WOOD MANUFACTURING CIP 48.0703.02

 

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: Cabinet makers are specific types of woodworkers who create and install cabinets in bathrooms, kitchens, other areas of homes and businesses. Typical duties of cabinet makers include designing custom cabinets, making cabinets, installing cabinetry, consulting with clients and other duties as needed. Cabinet makers are responsible for cutting and shaping wood, preparing surfaces and forming a completed product.

 

 

BEST PRACTICE CORE

 

 

EXAMPLE ILP-RELATED

CAREER TITLES

Choose (4) FOUR CREDITS from the following:

 

• 480719 Technical Drawing and Blueprint Reading* AND 480720 Wood Finishing*

• 480740 Wood ProductManufacturing

• 480731 Cabinet Making Technology

• 480733 Advanced Wood Processing

• 480725 CAD for WoodTechnology*

• 480721 Furniture Technology

• 480110 Introduction to Computer AidedDrafting

• 480716 Lumber Grading and Drying

• 480711 Introduction to Panel Processing

• 480733 Advanced Wood Processing

• 480717 Millwork Technology

• 480741 Co-op I (Wood) OR

480744 Internship (Wood)

 

Note: (*) Indicates half-credit (.5) course

Production Woodworker Machine Setter Millworker

CNC Operator

Wood Product Supervisor

Furniture Maker Wood Technologist

Wood Product Engineer

 

 

Welding technology

Jerald Gilbert

 

School Year    2018-2019

First Period

Second Period

Third Period

Fourth Period

Sixth Period

Seventh Period

Basic Welding/

Basic Blueprint Reading

Basic Welding/

Basic Blueprint Reading

 

Gas Metal Arc Welding

 

(GMAW)

 

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

 

(GTAW)

Shielded Metal Arc Welding

 

(SMAW)

Shielded Metal Arc Welding

 

(SMAW)

 

 

Basic Blueprint Reading

½ credit

BRX 120

 

9-10

This course presents basic applied math, lines, multi-view drawings, symbols, various schematics and diagrams, dimensioning techniques, sectional views, auxiliary views, threads and fasteners, and sketching typical to all shop drawings. Safety will be emphasized as an integral part of the course.

 

Basic Welding

½ credit

WLD 150

 

9-10

 

 

Students are introduced to welding, cutting processes, and related equipment. Basic setup, operation, and related safety are applied.

 

 

 

Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) / Lab

 

WLD 120/121

 

10-11

Students learn the identification, inspection, and maintenance of SMAW electrodes; principles of SMAW; the effects of variables on the SMAW process to weld plate and pipe; and metallurgy.

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

 

WLD 130

 

11-12

This course covers identification, inspection, and maintenance of GTAW machines; identification, selection and storage of GTAW electrodes; principles of GTAW; effects of variables on the GTAW process; and metallurgy. This course also teaches the theory and application of Plasma Arc Cutting.

 

 

 

Gas Metal Arc Welding / Lab

WLD 140/141

 

 

11-12

 

This course covers identification, inspection, and maintenance of GMAW machines; identification, selection and storage of GMAW electrodes; principles of GMAW; and the effects of variables on the GMAW process. Theory and applications of related processes such as FCAW and SAW and metallurgy are also included. Students learn the practical application and manipulative skills of Gas Metal Arc Welding and the proper safety situations needed in this process. Both ferrous and non-ferrous metals will be covered, as well as various joint designs on plate in all positions.

 

 

 

 

WELDER-ENTRY LEVEL CIP 48.0508.01

 

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: An Entry Level Welder demonstrates the ability to assist lead welders in the fabrication of steel and metal structures. Must be adept at performing basic welding functions and calculating dimensions as well as operating power equipment, grinders and other related tools. Must be proficient in reading and interpreting basic blueprints and following work procedure specifications (WPS).

 

BEST PRACTICE CORE

 

 

EXAMPLE ILP-RELATED

Choose (4) FOUR CREDITS from the following:

• 480505 Blueprint Reading for Welding OR

499920 Basic Blueprint Reading* AND 480524 Basic Welding

• 480523 Oxy-fuel Systems OR

480501 Cutting Processes

• 480521 Shielded Metal Arc Welding(SMAW)

• 480522 Gas Metal ArcWelding

• 480533 GMAW GrooveLab

• 480528 SMAW Groove Welds with BackingLab

• 480535 SMAW Open GrooveLab

• 480525 Gas Tungsten ArcWelding

• 480538 Gas Tungsten Pipe Welding Pipe LabA

• 480530 GTAW GrooveLab

• 480540 GMAW Pipe LabA

• 480534 GMAW AluminumLab*

• 480537 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Pipe LabB

• 480541 Cooperative Education (Welding)OR

480544 Internship (Welding)

Note: (*) Indicates half-credit (.5) course

Combination Welder

Pipe Welder

Ironworker

Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welder

Certified Welding Inspector (CWI)

Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Welding Engineer

Structural Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

 

 

Health Sciences

Rachel Hillard

School Year    2018-2019

First Period

Second Period

Third Period

Fourth Period

Sixth Period

Seventh Period

Principles of Health Science

 

Principles of Health Science

 

Medical Terminology/

Emergency Procedures

 

Pharmacy Technology

Medicaid Nurse Aide

MNA 100

Body Structures and Functions

 

 

 

Medical Terminology

½ Credit

AHS 120 

Prerequisite:  None

 

10-11

Medical Terminology designed to develop a working knowledge of language in all health science major areas. Students acquire word-building skills by learning prefixes, suffixes, roots and abbreviations. Students will learn correct pronunciation, spelling and application rules. By relating terms to body systems, students identify proper use of words in a medical environment. Knowledge of medical terminology enhances the student’s ability to successfully secure employment or pursue advanced education in health care.

 

Emergency Procedures

½ Credit

CPR 100/SFA 100

Prerequisite:  None

 

10-11

This course will focus on potential emergency situations. It is designed to promote an understanding of standard precautions necessary for personal and professional health maintenance and infection control. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will demonstrate the necessary skills in First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and will be given the opportunity to take the completion examination as outlined by the sponsoring agency.

 

Principles of Health Science

AHS 105

Prerequisite:  None

 

 

9-10        

Principles of Health Science is an orientation and foundation for occupations and functions in any health care profession. The course includes broad health care core standards that specify the knowledge and skills needed by the vast majority of health care workers. The course focuses on exploring health career options, history of health care, ethical and legal responsibilities, leadership development, safety concepts, health care systems and processes and basic health care industry skills. This introductory course may be a prerequisite for additional courses in the Health Science program.

 

 

 

 

Medicaid Nurse Aide

MNA 100

Prerequisite:  HEA 102

 

11-12

An instructional program that prepares individuals to perform routine nursing related services to patients in hospitals or long-term care facilities, under the training and supervision of an approved registered nurse. State Registry is available upon successful completion of state written and performance examination. Prior to offering this course, the instructor and health science program must be approved for meeting state requirements set by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

 

Body Structures and Functions

 

 

 

 

12

Body Structures and Functions (formerly Basic Anatomy and Physiology) is designed to provide knowledge of the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on normalcy. The interactions of all body systems in maintaining homeostasis will promote an understanding of the basic human needs necessary for health maintenance Academic knowledge from life science core content as it relates to the human body will be included. Laboratory activities should be a part of the course when appropriate.

 

Pharmacy Technician

 

 

 

 

12

This course may be completed as an independent study or classroom course during the student’s senior year. Material covered will include: Orientation, Federal Law, Medication Review, Aseptic Techniques, Calculations, and Pharmacy Operations. It is suggested that students complete and document at least 5-10 hours of observation and/or interview with a pharmacist or pharmacy technician. Upon completion of this internship, students are eligible to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification examination in order to obtain national certification. This internship requires supervised on-the-job work experience related to the students' education objectives in the area of Pharmacy Technician. Students participating in the internship do not receive compensation. Students will be required to follow program and agency requirements for attendance and health screenings. These may include but are not limited to: drug screens, TB skin test, and immunization certificates.

A Memorandum of Agreement must be completed for all clinical sites. The clinical portion of this course requires a minimum of 50 hours of experience—40 hours in a retail pharmacy and 10 hours in a hospital pharmacy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEALTH SCIENCES CAREER PATHWAYS

2018-2019

 

 

PRE-NURSING CIP 51.2699.01

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: This pathway prepares individuals for admission to a professional program in Nursing. This pathway focuses on caring for residents in a long term care facility.

 

BEST PRACTICE COURSES

 

Complete (3) THREE CREDITS:

 

• 170111 Principles of Health Science

• 170141 Emergency Procedures* AND 170131 MedicalTerminology**

• 170631 Medicaid Nurse Aide

 

Choose (1) ONE CREDIT from the following:

 

• 170167 Body Structures and Functions OR 302631 Anatomy (Science Course)

• 170169 MedicalMath**

• 170601 Co-op (Nursing)

 

Note: (*) Indicates half-credit (.5) course

Note: (**) Indicates course

 

 

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN CIP 51.0805.01

 

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: This pathway prepares individuals, under the supervision of pharmacists, to prepare medications, provide medications and related assistance to patients, and manage pharmacy clinical and business operations. Includes instruction in medical and pharmaceutical terminology, principles of pharmacology and pharmaceutics, drug identification, pharmacy laboratory procedures, prescription interpretation, patient communication and education, safety procedures, record-keeping, measurement and testing techniques, pharmacy business operations, prescription preparation, logistics and dispensing operations, and applicable standards and regulations.

 

BEST PRACTICE COURSES

 

Complete (3) THREE CREDITS:

• 170111 Principles of Health Science

• 170141 Emergency Procedures* AND 170131 MedicalTerminology**

• 170558 Pharmacy Technician

 

Choose (1) ONE CREDIT from the following:

• 170167 Body Structures and Functions OR 302631 Anatomy (Science Course)

• 170169 MedicalMath**

• 170501 Allied Health Core Skills

• 170614 Pharmacological and Other TherapeuticModalities

Note: (*) Indicates half-credit (.5) course

Note: (**) Indicates course can be half-credit (.5) OR a full (1) credit course

 

 

Carpentry

Edward Maupin

 

School Year     2018-2019

First Period

Second Period

Third Period

Fourth Period

Sixth Period

Seventh Period

Floor and Wall Framing

 

 

Introduction to Carpentry

 

Introduction to Carpentry

 

 

Floor and Wall Framing

 

 

Exterior and Interior Finish

Ceiling and Roof Framing

 

 

 

Introduction to Carpentry

CAR 130/131

 

9-10

This course is the introduction to the construction carpentry industry. The class will emphasize safe and proper methods of operating hand tools, portable power tools, and stationary power tools in the construction industry.

NOTE: Content in the course should be aligned with the Carpentry Pathway being offered; Commercial and /or Residential

 

 

 

 

Floor and Wall Framing

CAR 190/191

 

10-11

The student will practice floor framing, layout, and construction of floor frames. Cutting and installing floor and wall framing members according to plans and specifications will also be practiced.

NOTE: Content in the course should be aligned with the Carpentry Pathway being offered; Commercial and /or Residential

 

 

Ceiling and Roof Framing

CAR 196/197

 

11-12

This course covers roof types and combinations of roof types used in the construction industry. The emphasis of this course is on layout, cutting and installing ceiling joists, rafters, roof sheathing, and roof coverings for both commercial and residential construction.

NOTE: Content in the course should be aligned with the Carpentry Pathway being offered; Commercial and /or Residential

 

 

Exterior and Interior Finish

CAR 200/201

 

11-12

This course presents basic concepts of building trim, gypsum wallboard, paneling, base, ceiling and wall molding with instruction on acoustical ceilings and insulation, wood floors, tile, inlaid adhesive and tools of the flooring trade. This course will continue to refine the techniques and skills taught in the previous carpentry courses. In this course, cost control, speed, and precision are emphasized. In addition, students will demonstrate the skills associated with the exterior finishing of a house.

 

 

 

 

CONSTRUCTION CARPENTRY TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAYS

2018-2019

 

RESIDENTIAL CARPENTER ASSISTANT CIP 46.0201.02

 

PATHWAY DESCRIPTION: This pathway prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to lay out, cut, fabricate, erect, install, and repair wooden structures and fixtures, using hand and power tools. Includes instruction in technical mathematics, framing, construction materials and selection, job estimating, blueprint reading, foundations and roughing-in, finish carpentry techniques, and applicable codes and standards.

BEST PRACTICE COURSES

 

EXAMPLE

ILP-RELATED

CAREER TITLES

Complete (4) FOUR CREDITS:

* 460201 Introduction to Construction Technology

* 460212 Floor and Wall Framing

* 460213 Ceiling and Roof Framing

* 460219 Exterior and Interior Finish

 

Carpenter Construction Laborer Construction Manager

Construction

Tradesperson

Drywall Installer Flooring Installer

Production

Woodworker

Cost Estimator

 

News

RED RIBBON WEEK  is a national event that recognizes an Undercover DEA officer,  Enrique Camarena,  who was tortured to death and killed in Mexico.  He was fighting the war of keeping drugs from crossing the border in the US.  As a national event in his honor we want the War on drugs to continue by making our students aware of  the choice of being drug free.  

 

The events that the YSC has planned to bring awareness of staying drug free are:

 

October 11 to November 9 - Scary  Anti-Drug Short Story.  Turn entries into the Library by the 9th of November.  First place Girl and Boy recieve a  fun gift package from YSC,  2nd place, 3rd, place and 4th place will receive a  movie pass @ London Regency 7 Movies. 

 

October 22 - 1st period classes decorate your door with an Anti-Drug theme.  

(You will have Monday-Thursday at 12 pm .  Doors will be judged Thursday. 1st place winners will receive free movie pass @ London Regency 7 Movies and coffee social sometime in November.  2nd and 3rd pkace will receive a red ribbon prize.)

 

October 23- "Get Comfortable and Say No To Drugs"  Pajama day. 

 

October 24 - "A Decade of Being Drug Free"  favorite Decade dress up.

 

October 24 - Kip Survey for 10th & 12th Grade students with English classes.  

 

October 25- REMIX will be here at 1:00 pm for a fun filled program to "Say No To Drugs"